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The Health Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

Every few years or so, a new “miracle” health product arrives on store shelves.

I can personally recall that in the 2010s, things like coconut milk, pomegranate juice, and avocado butter have been all the rage. And despite how trendy some of these products have become, they are – generally speaking – heathy to consume. (Certainly, eating an avocado spread isn’t as bad for your diet as consuming things like butter. . .)

But there’s a new product that is great for your health, which, really, isn’t so new at all: Apple Cider Vinegar. Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) have been used since ancient times, with evidence that the Romans, Babylonians, and Egyptians have all consumed or used ACV for various health purposes. Nowadays, ACV is available at almost any grocery store, and it isn’t expensive to buy (unlike other trendy health products).

So, what makes ACV so good for you?

For one, ACV contains potassium. According to Paul and Patricia Bragg, “Potassium might be called the great detergent of the arteries,” they write. “Potassium slows down hardening and clogging processes that cause deadly harm to the whole cardiovascular system.”

Moreover, ACV contains antifungal, antiviral, and antibacterial properties, according to author Britt Brandon in his book, Apple Cider Vinegar for Health. Brandon recommends that ACV is best consumed by diluting it. “Because of its high acidity, ACV should never be consumed straight or without dilution to avoid damage to tooth enamel and tissues within the mouth, esophagus, and stomach.”

Personally, the way I like to consume ACV is by adding three teaspoons of it to hot water and mixing it with a bit of lemon juice or even a little honey. In my view, the extra ingredients taste good and do not interfere with ACVs healing and health properties.

Give it a try.

AVC, according to Brandon, isn’t a heavily marketed product, so you may not have heard of it before. But despite its humble beginnings and relatively low profile, ACV is a great product that may yield plenty of health benefits.

References:

Bragg, P., & Bragg, P. Apple Cider Vinegar. Bragg Health Crusades. Santa Barbra, CA.

Brandon, B. (2014). Apple Cider Vinegar for Health. Adams Media. Avon, MA.

Kenny Luck
Kenny Luck
Kenny Luck is an author and educator from Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. A graduate of Marywood University in Scranton, PA, Luck holds a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science and graduated with a Master's Degree in Education from the same institution in 2010. He has written for local publications such as The Weekender. His published work includes: Thumbing Through Thoreau (2010), NEPATIZED (2011), and 101 Facts of Love (2014). Luck has worked in public relations and media, and has taught college-level writing courses at several colleges and universities around Northeastern Pennsylvania. In 2010, he was voted "Best Author" by Electric City readers.

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